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Traditional art-promoting groups

Sat Mar 8, 2014, 7:00 AM


Traditional art-promoting groups




Do you share your artwork on DeviantArt? Congratulations, this might help you progress as an artist by getting known amongst the community and grow by getting feedback and tips on your work. You are also getting inspired by seeing new artworks, searching for artists that interest you and reading tutorials, articles. Great way to gain more exposure for your artworks is to join groups and share deviations in group's galleries. Best groups on DeviantArt are full of the most inspiring works, share tutorials and publish valuable articles, feature art, organize contests and most of all - admins of those groups are active and take care of their submissions in a short amount of time. They have no problem to communicate and accept suggestions. This article's purpose is to share groups that specialize in sharing traditional artworks - consider becoming a member :)





:icontraditionalists: Traditionalists > The group was created in order to give the traditional community a broader audience and to help shine more light onto the joys of traditional art. More about the project > What is Traditionalists / Traditionalists Events

:iconsense-create-lnspire: Sense-Create-lnspire > Member submissions are auto-accepted, 2 submissions every week per member allowed. The group also shares resources, tutorials, articles and promotes your artworks further to Twitter and FB.

:icontraditional-help: Traditional-help > The group accepts submissions on daily basis and shares resources. Submissions are auto-approved.

:iconlearning-to-draw: Learning-To-Draw > This is a group for aspiring artists to collaborate and commit to submitting art on a regular basis in order to improve their art skills.Submissions accepted daily.

:iconpaintingopen: PaintingOpen > Unlimited submissions, auto-approved. Over 3600 members following this group.

:iconthetraditionalart: TheTraditionalArt > 5 deviations per day accepted, over 1800 members.

:iconparadiseofartists: ParadiseOfArtists > 2 submissions per day, they are very picky, but the galleries look fantastic and your work gets promoted in polls and journals. Make sure to submit your best work!

:iconalltraditionalart: AllTraditionalArt > Over 1200 members, 3 submission per day allowed.

:iconilovetraditionalart: ILoveTraditionalART > 5 submissions per day allowed.

:icontraditionalartworld: TraditionalArtWorld > Unlimited submissions.

:iconall-traditional-art: All-Traditional-Art > Unlimited submissions.




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Watercolor Techniques

Fri Mar 7, 2014, 11:25 AM


Watercolor Techniques I




Traditional Art Week at projecteducate continues! During Artist's Toolbox weeks, I've published articles dedicated to watercolor tools (Watercolor Equipment I - Basic Tools, Watercolor Equipment II - Additional Tools). You should go grab your tools now, because the next series of articles will be focusing on painting methods. I sincerely hope these will help you and wish you all happy painting! :#1:



DSC 0298 crop 2 by jane-beata






Laying a wash



A wash is a large area in a watercolor painting where the paint flow and diffusion have been manipulated to efface individual brushstrokes. Within wash areas, color transitions are usually gradual and span analogous hues. Laying a wash is one of the most satisfying tasks in watercolor painting. Essentials of this skill are not difficult to learn, but to master the craft you will have to practice a bit. Washes are mostly used to create a flawless portrait background or a landscape sky that shades bright to mist.


▲ Tools:


You'll need a piece of watercolor paper stretched on a drawing board, a large flat brush, a jar of clean water, a cloth or a tissue for drying your brush and something to prop your drawing board up at a 30-degree angle to the horizontal.


▲ How to:


1 - You will need to tilt your painting surface first. The tilt creates a fall line or directed gravitational flow across the paper. This pulls the wash solution from high to low and collects the excess liquid in a reservoir, called the wash bead, along the bottom edge of the last brushstroke. Each brushstroke cuts into the existing wash bead and creates a wetted area underneath it, allowing it to flow down the stroke to the new edge.

2 - Charge your brush with paint. Starting at the top edge of the paper, put down a broad horizontal stroke, from one side to the other as if you were drawing a line with a pencil. Don't lift your brush until you're all the way across.

3 - Add more paint to your brush, then make another horizontal stroke making sure that the tip of your brush picks up the wash bead from the previous stripe. Don't paint above the bead, you'll ruin the evenness of your wash. You should work quickly to prevent lines in your wash.

4 - Continue this way until you get to the bottom of the paper. Squeeze the excess paint from your brush between a fold of cloth, then use the brush tip to lift the excess paint from the last stroke. Important > Leave the painting surface tilted until the wash dries completely.


▲ Graded wash


A graded wash is wash in which the color lightens towards the bottom of the page. To create graded wash, work in a similar way than explained above, but instead of loading your brush with more paint for each subsequent stroke, you load your brush with clean water thereby diluting the wash. Lift the excess water from the last stroke and leave to dry at an angle.


Texture Article by jane-beata

Back to Top





Wonderful watercolor tutorials to see



Watercolour Basics - Technique by the-artists-cubby   Watercolor tutorial part 2 by Melimaiel  Watercolor Tutorial English by Yenni-Vu  Watercolor Tutorial [Techniques + Flowers] by Ze-RoFruits

Painting a flat watercolor wash
Painting a graded watercolor wash






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Interviewing Maja Wronska (takmaj)

Fri Mar 7, 2014, 5:54 AM


Interviewing Maja Wronska (takmaj)



Portovenere vol 2 by takmaj Portovenere by takmaj



You're a freshly graduated architect, am I correct? When did you realize for the first time that this is something you want to do with your life?

Yes, you are – I’m very happy about it. Well, to be honest, it all started when I was just a baby. My mom is an architect, she never forced me to be one, but, well, I just get some of her passion in my blood. When I was a kid, she let me color drawing designs of facades, and sometimes she showed those drawings to actual clients! I was so proud when she wasn’t ashamed of my drawings and I have to say that I was only 5 years old. In addition, we always have millions of colored pencils and all range of paints at home, and I could use them all the time, besides they were meant for professional usage, not for 4 or 5 years’ old children.


Glyptotek by takmaj



What makes watercolor your favorite artistic medium? Did you ever try acrylic or oil, painting on canvas?

Yes, I painted with acrylic, but I hated how messy they are. I never used all paints, some of them I wasted and I never liked it. Watercolors are easy, clean and wonderful.



Rialto by takmaj



Your gallery is one of the most cheerful places to see when browsing through DeviantArt. How do you pick colors for your next painting?

Wow, thank you. Well, before every painting, I browse the Internet and look for some photos to see the climate etc. When I think about a building or a city, I see the whole picture in my mind with colors and tones I should use.


Golden gate bridge by takmaj



Have you ever painted portraits or other subjects that does not connect to architecture?

I can say that architectural art is my area of expertise. I believe people should learn some basics and principles before painting any subject. I know a lot of construction rules, have a knowledge about historical and contemporary buildings, so even when I paint or draw some made up buildings, they still could exist and work. It really makes me upset when I look at someone's architectural drawing and see that there is no possible way people could walk into the building from the picture, or it could collapse, or the worst thing - perspective is messed up. I might be old-fashioned but I think it’s better to learn basics first and then start to show off :) (Smile) That’s why I never upload any portraits. What’s more, I create artwork that I personally would hang on my wall, cause I’m not a fan of people's faces "staring" at me from the pictures. But of course it’s my personal opinion, I don’t want to be offensive.


Summer day by takmaj



How large is an average piece painted by you and how long does it take to finish it?

I usually paint on a paper that is 42cm high and 56wide, and it takes me about 4-5 hours.


Siena by takmaj



Tell us about your favorites tools of the trade, what kinds do you use?

I use White Night’s watercolor and pretty random paper, sometimes Fabriano, sometimes not. I have 3 brushes (two of them are borrowed from my friend 8 years ago :) (Smile) ). In my humble opinion what really matters is the ability and the strong will, not the tool you use.


lanterns in Poznan by takmaj



Do you have favorite artists on DeviantArt? Who are they, show us galleries or artworks that we shouldn't overlook.

The deviation which I like the most is El despertar del robot by Thelastsumer, the idea of dancing building is so fresh and funny, I love the colors and everything about that piece of art.
Second is Chills by PascalCampion, I am probably the greatest fan of Pascal's work in the world, I just love everything he draws, especially those family scenes
The last but not least is Imagine This by Trichardsen, I love auroras photos and it's my dream to see that in person one day. I also really like pictures taken by Pajunen :) (Smile)


Thank you, takmaj Heart


:iconprojecteducate:





Traditional Art Week


Our team of Community Volunteers and senior contributors have put together another Traditional Art Week at projecteducate that is going on right now (3rd - 9th March 2014) - keep in touch and check out INTRODUCTION blog to see what we have prepared for you. Next Traditional Art Week is scheduled for June, feel free to suggest a topic you'd like us to write more about, using this forum.

Summary with our previous Traditional art week's articles can be found HERE.


Traditionalists

There is a lot going on over at Traditionalists. Our current activities include bi-weekly chat events, that are taking place at #CommunityRelations, usually on Sunday (schedule can be found HERE). We are also running Stock challenges, for more details check out this journal. We also have a new contributor (Entwinedbliss), that is putting together interesting interviews on a regular basis.

Are you interested in getting involved with Traditionalists and contribute? See more detailed info in this journal.


Traditionalists 01 / Traditionalists 02 / Traditionalists events



Traditional Art DD Round-ups



May 2013 Traditional Art DD Round-Up
June 2013 Tradtitional Art DD Round-Up
July 2013 Traditional Art DD Round-Up
September 2013 Traditional Art DD Round-up
October 2013 Traditional Art DD round-up
November 2013 Traditional Art DD round-up





Other Things of Interest









                                                 Spring Features






Traditional Art Techniques II

Wed Mar 5, 2014, 7:07 AM


Traditional Art Techniques II


Traditional Art Week continues! This article will give you a brief overview of even more physical media techniques and their characteristics, featuring beautiful examples found all over DeviantArt and tutorials. I sincerely hope this will get you inspired to try something new and experiment, why not pick a tutorial and see what you learn! Don't forget, whilst techniques has their own regulations and principles, they still can be combined, you have to be no wizard (just a little creative) to find a new way to express yourself through them.  Let's take a look  Singing 

(Traditional Art Techniques I)




1. Drawing media II



Drawing is one of the major forms of expression within the visual arts, and is generally concerned with the marking of lines and areas of tone onto paper. Traditional drawings were monochrome, or at least had little color,  while modern colored-pencil drawings may approach or cross a boundary between drawing and painting. Drawing is often exploratory, with considerable emphasis on observation, problem-solving and composition. It is also regularly used in preparation for painting. A quick, unrefined drawing may be called a sketch. In fields outside art, technical drawings or plans of buildings, machinery, circuitry and other things are often called "drawings" even when they have been transferred to another medium by printing. (Wiki)



▲ Pen (ballpoint, fountain)


A pen is primarily a writing implement used to apply ink to a surface (usually paper), for writing or - in this case - drawing. Ruling pens allow precise adjustment of line width, and still find a few specialized uses, but technical pens are more commonly used. Modern types, often used to create artworks, include ballpoint, fountain or ceramic tip pens. A ballpoint pen dispenses viscous oil-based ink by rolling a small hard sphere. The ink dries almost instantly on contact with paper. They are usually reliable, inexpensive and can be an excellent medium for serious fine art or illustration. A fountain pen uses water-based liquid ink delivered through a nib. The ink flows from a reservoir through a "feed" to the nib, then through the nib, due to capillary action and gravity. Fountain pens are nowadays also used for artistic purposes or by professional designers.

Tutorials to see > The ballpoint pen art book by ArtisAllan, Tutorial for Ballpoint-Pens by forkfighter


Redhead Girl - Ballpoint Pen by VianaArts Ballpoint Pen Icarus by kleinmeli



▲ Marker


A marker pen (marking pen, felt-tip pen, flow, marker) is a pen which has its own ink-source, and usually a tip made of a porous, pressed fibers such as felt. A typical permanent marker consists of a container (glass, aluminum or plastic) and a core of an absorbent material. All kinds of markers are available on the market (permanent markers, highlighters, non-permanent markers, security markers, election markers). Drawing with markers offers almost instant gratification - markers are simple to use, require little preparation time and dry quickly. They are ideal for creating loose lines, caligraphic designs and precise technical illustrations.

Tutorials to see > Copic Marker Tutorial by finni, Copic Marker Tutorial I by cartoongirl7


Portrait by marker by carlosCL General Iroh marker by BryanValenza





▲ Conté

Also known as Conté sticks or Conté crayons, they are a drawing m edium composed of compressed pwdered graphite or charcoal mixed with a wax or clay base, square in cross-section. They were invented in 1795 by Nicolas-Jacques Conté, and had the advantage of being cost-effective to produce, easy to manufacture in controlled grades of hardness. Nowadays they're manufactured using natural pigments, clay and a binder. Conté crayons are most commonly found in black, white and sanguine tones, as well as bistre, shades of grey and other colors. Colors sets are especially used for field studies and color studies. Some artists create entire paintings with them, using them the way pastels are used.

Tutorials to see > How to draw with conte crayons

whither? by derekjones [113] Untitled Charcoal & Conte On Canvas 53.2 by ShinKwangHo


▲ Crayon

A crayon (or wax pastel) is a stick of colored wax, charcoal, chalk or other material. They're available at a range of price points, are easy to work with, often less messy than paints and markers, blunt, usually non-toxic, and are available in a wise variety of colors. You can work with either water-resistant or water-soluble crayons. They are particularly good instruments for teaching small children to draw in addition to being used widely by student and professional artists.

Tutorials to see > tips: pencil crayon basics by kitton

You're Never too old for crayons by artisticalshell crayon drawing of leonid afrem by rayjaurigue







1. Painting media


Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a surface. The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and airbrushes can be used. Painting is a mode of creative expression, and the forms are numerous. Drawing, composition or abstraction and other aesthetics may serve to manifest the expressive and conceptual intention of the practitioner. Different types of paint are usually identified by the medium that the pigment is suspended or embedded in, which determines the general working characteristics of the paint, such as viscosity, miscibility, solubility, drying time, etc. (Wiki)




▲ Encaustic painting


Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually prepared wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. Metal tools and special brushes can be used to shape the paint before it cools, or heated metal tools can be used to manipulate the wax once it has cooled onto the surface. Today, tools such as heat lamps, heat guns, and other methods of applying heat allow artists to extend the amount of time they have to work with the material. Because wax is used as the pigment binder, encaustics can be sculpted as well as painted.

Tutorials to see >  Art - Encaustic Tutorials

White Rabbit by readyo encaustic portrait 2 by aminotturtely



▲ Tempera / poster paint


Tempera, also known as egg tempera, is a permanent, fast-drying painting medium consisting of colored pigment mixed with water-soluble binder medium (usually a glutinous material such as egg yolk). Tempera also refers to the paintings done in this medium. A paint consisting of pigment and glue size commonly used in the United States as poster paint is also often referred to as "tempera paint", although the binders and sizes in this paint are different from traditional tempera paint. It either comes in large bottles or jars or in a powdered form. It is normally a "cheap" paint used in theatrical backdrops or in grade school art classes.

Tutorials to see > Tempera Colour Tutorial by Chenria

There's No Pain Now by RobM48 Pixels 03 by monguz



▲ Stencil


A stencil is a thin sheet of material, such as paper, plastic, or metal, with letters or a design cut from it, used to produce the letters or design on an underlying surface by applying pigment through the cut-out holes in the material. The key advantage of a stencil is that it can be reused to repeatedly and rapidly produce the same letters or design. The design produced with a stencil is also called a stencil.

Tutorials to see > How to cut stencils Tutorial

Stencil by kristrappeniers Stencil Monkey by sark-stencil



▲ Fresco


Fresco is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid lime plaster. Water is used as the vehicle for the pigment and the painting becomes an integral part of the wall. The fresco technique has been employed since antiquity and is closely associated with Italian Renaissance painting.







What is your favorite technique? Do you like to mix different media?


Your thoughts and comments are welcome!


Frail


:iconprojecteducate:




Traditional Art Week Introduction

Mon Mar 3, 2014, 9:19 AM


Hello everyone Hi!

Welcome to our Traditional Art Week (March 3rd - 9th)


Three months since the previous one, we are back with the entire week dedicated to Traditional art! Our small team has put their heads together to bring you a handful of articles that we believe you will find useful and interesting. Don't forget to join our chat event on Sunday (March 9th) that will take place over at #CommunityRelations, noon PST (12.00 pm) - we'll see you there!

If you wish to contribute a traditional art-related article during our next Traditional Art Week (June 2014) or have suggestions for topics you'd like to read about, please comment here. Heart


Monday March 3rd

Traditional Art Week Introduction blog by jane-beata


Tuesday March 4th

#Traditionalists by Astralseed
#Traditionalists Events
by
Astralseed


Wednesday March 5th

Traditional art techniques II by jane-beata
Collage Art by ArtByCher


Thursday March 6th

Combining Techniques by Xadrea
Traditional Mixed Media
by
Astralseed


Friday March 7th

Interviewing takmaj by jane-beata
Watercolor Techniques by
jane-beata


Saturday March 8th

Traditional art-promoting groups by jane-beata
Sketches and sketchbooks
by
SylwiaTelari


Sunday March 9th

Chat event by Astralseed
Traditional Art Week Summary blog by jane-beata


We hope you all enjoy upcoming articles La la la la

:iconprojecteducate:





Artist's Toolbox: Dry pastel

Sun Feb 23, 2014, 6:01 AM





Artist's Toolbox: Dry Pastel



A Pastel is an art medium consisting of pure powdered pigment and a binder of a neutral hue and low saturation. Pastels have been used by artists since Renaissance, but gained popularity mostly in the 18th century, when a number of notable artists made pastel their primary medium. An artwork created in pastel is called a pastel drawing or a pastel painting. We mentioned pastel as one of traditional art techniques in a series of articles written for Traditional Art Weeks of projecteducate 


Pastels cannot be mixed on a palette like paints, but are mixed on the paper by overlaying and blending. The exact composition and characteristics of an individual pastel stick depends on the type of pastel and the type and amount of binder used. It also varies by individual manufacturer. There are two types of pastel - dry pastel (sticks of ground pigment mixed with chalk and gum) and oil pastel (oil or wax is used as a binder). In this article, we will be talking about dry pastel. 


1000 Pix Checker by jane-beata


▲ About dry pastel


Dry pastels are available in varying degrees of hardness, the softer varieties being wrapped in a paper. Soft pastels is the most widely used form of pastel, the sticks have a higher portion of pigment and less binder, which results in brighter colors. Finished drawings require protecting with a fixative spray to prevent smudging and framing under the glass. Pan pastels are formulated with a minimum of binder in flat compacts (like women's makeup) and applied with a special sponge tools, no liquid is involved. Hard pastels have a higher portion of binder with less pigment, producing a sharp drawing material suitable to create fine details. Hard pastels are traditionally used to do preliminary sketches with (composition planning), or in combination with softer pastels. It's sufficient to mention that these colors are less brilliant and are available in a restricted range in contrast to soft pastels. Lastly, pastel pencils are pencils with a pastel lead that are very useful to add details. 


DSC 0150 900 pix crop by jane-beata DSC 0111 900 pix crop by jane-beata





▲ How to use pastels


Choosing your tools - First of all, choose your palette appropriately, for starters you don't need many, a set of 12 will be more than enough. You can pick a specific color theme, such as shades of grey or earth tones. Another thing you'll need is a proper surface, paper with "tooth" or texture, with the ability to grab the pigment and hold it. Good art supply stores have paper specifically designed for pastel drawing available. You can also use charcoal paper or even canvas to draw on.

Blending - You can use your finger (some artists prefer this, some don't recommend due to messy working practices) or paper stumps (cylinders made of layers of paper) for blending, even paper tissues. The softest pastels can be also applied with brushes designed for working with pastel.

Erasing - Be careful when working with your eraser around a pastel painting, never try to rub off the pigment. Knead the eraser to make it pliable, then press it to your work to lift the pigment off.

Working habits - Before you start, plan your composition, make a light sketch using pencil or harder pastel. Work from dark to light > start with the darkest tones, adding lighter ones, layering and blending as you go. Make sure to clean the pastel dust from your workplace frequently, try not to inhale it. It's okay to use an easel, in which case the dust naturally falls into the ground and won't irritate you. Keep your hands clean, it will help you not to create an accidental smudges that will be hard to remove. Make a habit of cleaning your pastel sticks as you work with them, using a dry towel or a tissue to remove any other pigment from them.

Fixation - Use a fixative spray after you're finished, be careful though and follow the instructions, it's usually toxic. You can use fixative even between layers of pastel drawing, this allows you to work on the next layer without smudging the previous one. 


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▲ Protection of pastel artworks


To create a permanent work with pastel, artists should keep few things in mind. Use only pastel with lightfast pigments (this goes for every technique, not just pastel), work only with acid-free archival quality supports. Works should be properly mounted, framed behind glass and stored away from the direct sunlight. As mentioned, it's okay to use a high quality fixative to prevent smudging, but be careful, as some fixatives may change the color of your pigments. Use of a hair spray instead of fixative is not recommended.





▲ Techniques, Tutorials, Resources for learning


Here are some fantastic resources for learning dry pastel techniques.



 Soft Pastel Dust Tutorial by TeaKitsune

Pastel tutorial by Sarahharas07

Charcoal and Pastel tutorial by gabbyd70

Best brands of Art Pastels


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Have you tried using dry pastel? 


Feel free to share your experience in the comments below :heart:


:frail:

Previous Toolbox articles:

Watercolor equipment - Basic Tools | Watercolor equipment II - Additional Tools | Pencil, Graphite, Charcoal


This article and many others was brought to you by :iconprojecteducate:  Still not a watcher? Join us!




PE: 5 reasons to love your job

Fri Feb 7, 2014, 7:10 AM


5 reasons to love your job




"Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life."

Confucius





Washed Up by DalaiHarma



1. Your work consumes a significant amount of your life time. If you don't love what you do, you spend way too much of your time being upset and uncomfortable.

2. You will probably never be truly great at what you do. Without passion and will to invest, improvement is unlikely to come.

3. You'll lack fulfillment. You'll be thinking about things you could be doing instead and watching the clock all the time. Your days won't be productive.

4. Without being productive, you won't get promoted. Without excitement and portfolio that shows progress, you won't get new customers.

5. While doing a job you don't like, you won't be able to do what you'd love to do more, be much better at and more productive. You will waste yourself.


Frustration by Fangfingers




"The biggest mistake  that you can make is to believe that you are working for somebody else. Job security is gone. The driving force of a career must come from the individual. Remember: Jobs are owned by the company, you own your career!"

Earl Nightingale





This article and many others was brought to you by :iconprojecteducate:  Still not a watcher? Join us!




Happy New Year, world!

Journal Entry: Wed Jan 1, 2014, 1:07 PM


It was a very happy year for me. After a decade, first year spent being single and living in my home town again, close to my family, that is everything to me. I had 3 exhibitions here this year and became a Community Volunteer on DeviantArt and I am forever grateful for everything life has brought me. I hope to continue on the path of seeking my inner peace, being a loving mother, daughter, sister and friend to those that take care of me.

Selfie, 2013 by jane-beata



What are your most proud accomplishments of 2013?
Where do you see yourself in 365 days?



Happy New Year, everyone :heart:




journal skin made by SylwiaTelari

Did you know that Sense-Create-lnspire has also a FACEBOOK PAGE ?



One specific part of our FB page is dedicated to Landscapes & Scenery category, artwork album Places. Every other day a new artwork is featured there.

This is a summary of all landscapes featured on our page during November 2013.


Enjoy the view :heart:










Traditional Art Week


Our team of Community Volunteers and senior contributors put together a Traditional Art Week at projecteducate (9th - 15th December 2013), you can find all the published articles HERE. Next Traditional Art Week is scheduled for March, feel free to suggest a topic you'd like us to write more about, using this forum.


Gallery Makeover Project


Changes in regards to the Traditional Art Gallery Tree haven't yet been finalized, you still have chance to provide feedback, that we greatly appreciate. Traditional Art Gallery Makeover Updated Proposals can be found here.


Traditionalists


Traditionalists will be opening up to new activities soon, we are currently looking for contributors from the community that wish to participate in events or with articles and features. You can find more detailed info in this journal.

Traditionalists 01 / Traditionalists 02



Traditional Art DD Round-ups



May 2013 Traditional Art DD Round-Up
June 2013 Tradtitional Art DD Round-Up
July 2013 Traditional Art DD Round-Up
September 2013 Traditional Art DD Round-up
October 2013 Traditional Art DD round-up
November 2013 Traditional Art DD round-up





Forum Threads of Interest


Digital vs. Traditional

Creativity vs. Skill

Bristol paper and what media to apply

What do you use your sketchbook for?





Other Things of Interest


Creating Art on Commission by jane-beata

ProjectPorkchop vol.291 by Astralseed

(-404) Deviant Found, vol.26 by SylwiaTelari

Traditional Trove 7 by RhynWilliams

Traditional Tuesdays #67 by deshrubber

How to sell your original paintings by ArtByCher





                                                    Winter Features



Ice Maiden by MayumiOgihara Christmas card 2013 by clockwerkjos

WINTER ON THE VORONTSOV PONDS by Badusev


Winter is coming by CoalRye  Veronika by ElenaShved
The Brook in Early Winter by litka
Winter Spirit barn owl by hontor


Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to everyone :heart:






                                     Previous Traditional Art Updates



Newsletter #2: Monthly feature + updates

Journal Entry: Sat Dec 21, 2013, 1:21 PM
Hello everyone :wave:

First of all, on 2nd of December we've became Supergroup - big THANKS to our donators, who supported us with points and made this possible. We will be posting more articles, features and polls, as well as customize our front page to look at least as great as your artworks submitted here. Donation pool is still open, it took us one year to collect points :)

Our recent donators:


:iconxxpseudoxx: :iconrhynwilliams: :icondygyt: :iconsloppygee: :iconprimalfuryan: :iconklarem: :iconastralseed:




Submissions


✿ Currently, all submissions into the "Member submissions, December 2013" folder are set to 2 per week for every member (submissions are auto-approved). Additionally, members are able to submit to group's Favorites (Featured folder) twice a week - 3 positive votes needed to get in. Second folder in our Favorites (Community help) is designed for submitting tutorials, articles, journals, anything that our traditional art community can benefit from - members can submit here twice a week as well, 1 contributor vote needed in order to get in.

✿ We are inviting traditional artists to join our group every day, those that wish to join themselves can apply, they will be auto-approved. Everyone can become a member of Sense-Create-lnspire to enjoy daily dose of a wonderful traditional art.

✿ Please, submit only your traditional artworks to the group! Manga & Anime/Traditional and Fan art/Traditional is also acceptable, but Photography, Digital art, etc will be removed from the group immediately and deviant will be notified. Why is this? We are group focused around traditionally made artworks, thank you for understanding :thumbsup:

Featured folder is the main folder of our gallery, only admins can submit there. We request all traditional Daily Deviations to be part of this folder as well as extraordinary artworks of our choice.




Monthly features


✿ We now have much more options to feature your artworks. Every month, we will pick 15 artworks from the current submissions folder and set polls to find community favorites. We will feature these artworks in our Newsletter journal as well as highlight 3 winners of each poll :)

November 2013 FEATURES

dance koi by kosharik69- Commission - Hetta and Hadrian - by LosenkoCinderella by ArdenEllenNixon

Coral by San-T Close your eyes. by XRlS Still Life by andr3d

A morning on Mariacka Street by sanderus You Should Have Known by LinnFeyling A STUDY IN FREEZING COLD by Badusev

Bird by Richard-Moon somwhere over the rainbow by TanyaShatseva Moth Girl by KaterinaChadoulou

Can I Hate You? by weroni Lena by ZawArt Rouen by takmaj

:frail:

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If you wish to contribute to our group with a regular feature, an article / blog post, please note the group with your ideas :#1:



Traditional Art Week Summary

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 2:14 PM


Traditional Art Week Summary


Oh my oh my, how time does fly! Our Traditional Art Week is now officially over, in case you missed any of our articles, here's the full list ♥

Many thanks to our hard-working contributors > Astralseed, ArtByCher, SylwiaTelari, Xadrea for their dedication!

Monday December 9th

Traditional art FEATURE CONTEST by jane-beata

Tuesday December 10th

If you like it, Feature it by jane-beata
Bump up your color by Xadrea

Wednesday December 11th

Traditional art techniques by jane-beata
How to photograph paintings by ArtByCher


Thursday December 12th

What to keep in mind when submitting traditional artworks by jane-beata
References by SylwiaTelari


Friday December 13th

Interviewing AuroraWienhold by jane-beata
Silk screen basics by Astralseed


Saturday December 14th

How to sell your artwork by ArtByCher
5 Reasons to try it the traditional way by jane-beata

Sunday December 15th

Chat event by Astralseed



Don't despair! Next Traditional Art Week is scheduled for March 3rd - 9th 2014! Since we covered some general topics this week, during the next one we'll be focusing on specific techniques and tutorials.
If you wish to suggest a topic for an article, please do so using this forum.



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5 Reasons to do it the traditional way

Sat Dec 14, 2013, 12:29 PM


5 Reasons to do it the traditional way


Traditional and Digital art are both completely different mediums, able to create the same product. It is possible to paint a beautiful, watercolor-like painting digitally, as well as achieve the cleanliness and color options of a digital piece traditionally. Therefore, using one or the other to express ourselves creatively is, just like many things in life, just an option. People may have personal, sometimes even illogical reasons for using one or the other and that's fine. Today, however, I'm a cheerleader for the "traditional side", and I offer you 5 reasons to do it traditionally!

:painter:


Vase Painter by JeremyLeach



1. Oh the wonderful smell of art supplies > I'm not talking about the toxic smell that come painting techniques require, of course. Rather about the feeling you get when entering a huge art supply store, touching all those brand new pencils and tubes, canvases.. Personally, I could never get attached to a Photoshop brush the way it's possible with new Polychromos.


2. Easier on eyes > Painting traditionally never exhausts your eyes as much as working on a screen all the time.


3. Physical touch > Have you ever tried to apply the paint to a canvas with just your fingers? It's very exciting but a sort of therapy at the same time. You can paint spontaneously, at large and making your whole body to be part of the process.

4. Producing an original artwork > The result of painting or drawing traditionally is an original painting or drawing. It's a one of a kind object that has it's special value.


5. Your house looks great! > It does. Even a mess, consisting of various brushes, paint, papers and sketches lying around, has it's charm and can even support your creativity. Also, an art easel is a very sexy object to own.


painter by Klikkanan



Do you prefer the traditional or digital way? What are your reasons?

Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below ♥


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Interviewing Aurora Wienhold

Fri Dec 13, 2013, 6:30 AM


Interviewing AuroraWienhold



Charlene Aurora Wienhold is one of the most popular traditional artists on DeviantArt. Her pictures are very characteristic and almost impossible to overlook, enchanting and thrilling at the same time. Since mid-2010, she works as a freelance illustrator and a concept artist, responsible for book illustrations, designs, concept arts and animation effects. (FAQ)
 

Season of blue - Previews by AuroraWienhold




You are one of the most diligent deviants I've met, you paint 10 hours every day and update your fan pages with admirable orderliness. How difficult does it get, do you sometimes struggle with your inner muse?

In fact, there are days I work even longer, but there are also days when I do not get to draw. For several years my creativity is absolutely flooding. Especially when I'm on a trip with my family, many ideas just come to me. I have filled few books with ideas and stories that might never even be implemented. You must know that I draw a lot of original designs for some companies, which I can not publish through my contracts, unfortunately. My biggest passion are graphic novels. In 2014, I'm going to work on a separate project, without a contract, so that I have a completely free hand on it, and I will also make it completely accessible to deviantART.

Jillian Aversa - Between ocean and sky by AuroraWienhold



Your paintings possess a significant charm as well as radiant coloring that enchanted over 40k deviants by now. Which attributes of your painting style could evoke the most intense response, in your opinion?

That's a tough question. I try not to analyze too much (as it was always done in art school). Of course I try to put the learned color theory in my work and love the golden section (sectio aurea), but for portraits, which I really adore to paint, I just prefer to paint it beautiful. Beautiful, shining eyes, as I am accustomed from my time as a comic artist. Expressive faces, but they also do not have to be perfect. Vividness is more important to me. And it's also good to tell a little story, even with the title of the work. I try to see the world with different eyes - but always beautiful.


Autumn's warmth by AuroraWienhold Just one smile by AuroraWienhold



A quite significant part of your gallery is dedicated to fan art. What speaks to you, the story or a specific face of a character?

I think I draw fan art because of the characters. Loki, for example, the one who makes you feel very sorry for him or Sherlock, who is addicted to his work just like I'm into art. Over the years, there must be over a hundred of these great characters, who have found a place in my heart. It's great to share this love for certain characters with others. How could you do this better than uploading fan art to deviantART?



Loki - The prince of Jotunheim by AuroraWienhold

Loki - God of Mischief by AuroraWienhold



Watercolor, ink and dry pastel seem to be your tools of choice when working traditionally. Do you think such technique can be mastered by anyone who dedicates his time to practice, or is rather a privilege of the naturally gifted and educated ones?


Don't forget the colored pencils and watercolor pencils. I often draw the sketch with them before I start with watercolors. I think between education and practice is not a big difference. Your education is only as good as the work you put into your homework. Today, you really get a good education by the internet. When you really enjoy making art, it would be great if you put as much exercise as possible in it. Only then you can figure out your own strengths and favorite techniques. There is an anecdote from my time at university: When we started in the first semester, we were all the best drawers and painters from our various schools. But at the art university not everyone stayed at drawing/painting. Some found that they were better in photography or corporate design. After the years, each one had specialized. The time had helped me a lot to find my own strengths. I can only advise everyone to take the time (whether with or without Uni).


Days with endless wonder - Preview by AuroraWienhold



Have you experienced an art theft? How do you feel about watermarks?

Naturally. If an image receives a certain amount of attention, it is probably unavoidable. But I do not get angry about it. There are so many great people who follow my uploads and report the stolen arts, that I didn't have to make it myself for a long time. For hardship cases, when someone is trying to make money with my art, I have an advocate, who cares.
I always add my page legible "Art by ...", for those who store images on their computers, so that the source can be found at any time. In addition a watermark, I do not need to make it too easy for thieves, right? If they remove the watermark they will never get the original image.


Narnia by AuroraWienhold



You are not only an exceptional painter but also an asset to our DA community, you have written quite a handful of tutorials and regularly share resources. What made you dedicate your time to these activities?

Thank you! If the day had more hours, I would really like to do more tutorials. Lately, I've decided rather making art instead of writing tutorials. But I like to share my experience of working materials and techniques. Maybe I 'll write a book someday. For now, videos are planned on my YouTube channel, as soon as I have the technology under control.

Aurora's Tutorial Gallery


Jack Preview by AuroraWienhold



Do you have inspirations and favorite artists here on DA?

It is rather the mixture of many impressions. I have an inspiration folder on dA. There you will find all the most creative works.


Forever yours by AuroraWienhold



Thank you, AuroraWienhold :heart:


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Submitting traditional artworks

Thu Dec 12, 2013, 6:06 AM


What to keep in mind when submitting traditional artworks


Traditional Art Week continues! Today, we'll discuss some things to consider when submitting your traditional artworks into DeviantArt.

Most of them are genuine recommendations, but taking them seriously might increase your over-all DA experience for good :)





1. Image size

One of the most common presentation mistakes is submitting a very small image of your work. Why is this an issue, I'm not entirely sure, perhaps it's the fear of art theft that makes your gallery consist of 300 x 300 pix large pictures, but you're not going to get new watchers nor people to favorite your work this way - viewers want to enjoy the detail and atmosphere of the piece, they will move on one second after they open the page. For optimal results, the larger side of your deviation should be about 800-900 pix. Some artists submit very large files of their work as a main deviation, with download option enabled. If it's your intention to provide free full-resolution image to everyone who stops by, good - it's your work after all. But if this is not what you wanted, rather enable print with it and than submit a lower resolution main file.

Nuu 


2. Proper category

Traditional artworks should be submitted into Traditional art / categories, this is no ground-breaking news. If you drew/painted fan art (copyrighted characters or stories), you can submit into Fan Art / Traditional, or in case of manga/anime, into Manga & Anime / Traditional. However, sometimes the artist uses digital editing or coloring on their original traditional drawing, where to put it then? On DeviantArt, we are always viewing traditional artworks in its digital form, therefore some basic editing is necessary and recommended - these would include contrast enhancement after scanning or crops, changes should follow one goal - to make the digital form appeal on the screen as close to the original as possible, not change it into a different artwork. If you impact your drawing with heavier digital touches, it belongs either into Traditional Art/ or Digital Art/, based on what medium outbalances the other. Use your best judgement when establishing this, to avoid reports or negative commentary. Regarding Traditional art / Mixed media category, when you're combining more traditional techniques, your final artwork belongs here as well (acrylic with oils would still go into Paintings, since you paint with your brush, etc.)

Important link > Traditional and Digital Mixed Media by Thiefoworld

Headbang! 


3. Watermarking

Extensive use of watermarks seems absolutely appropriate, given how many art theft journals I get to read every other month. On the other hand, many of you simply use the default DeviantArt watermark, heavily obstructing your own beautiful pictures, sparing yourself the opportunity to be added into many more people's Favorites or being featured. In another words, a picture that I fave has an aesthetic value and a watermark like this destroys it. It also covers certain corners of the artwork, stopping me from appreciating details. I understand that almost every artist, at least a bit popular on the internet, gets their pictures stolen by someone. This is one of the worst experiences you can have here, but in most cases people "just" claim your work being theirs on another social site to gain attention, it rarely hurts you economically (rarely someone gets your high-resolution images to sell prints, for example). Just make sure that your pursuit to protect yourself doesn't cost you exposure and potential fans / customers.

Important links > To watermark or not to watermark by Elandria

ATB - An alternative to watermarks: Metadata by Lyricanna


Woohooooo! 


4. Listing techniques

List your techniques properly. This is not obligatory, nobody will remove your deviation because the description window is empty or you haven't written what kind of pen you used, but let me give you few reasons why it might pay off to bother > it's easier to include your work into an article feature that demonstrates use of different techniques, many traditional art groups won't accept your work if your tools aren't listed properly and finally you might encourage potential customers / commissioners by being clear about your work methods. It also serves an educational purpose, in general. Please do it, thank you :P

Singing  


5. Crediting your sources

Last but not in your dreams least! This particular point is the most important, most annoying and unfair when not done correctly. Credit should be given where the credit is due, end of story. If you used an outside source in your work, it should be properly listed in an artist's description window along with a link to the website. If you're drawing a portrait based on another photographer's work, credit the photographer, it's easy as that. There is no shame in using references for drawings and paintings, many professionals as well as students do that, some of us have opportunities to take our own references that suit to our artistic needs, some don't. Crediting the reference author is honest and right. On another but related note, you cannot use every picture you find on the internet as your drawing reference, even when you credit them. If you're publishing the final work, permission is needed. It is highly recommended to contact the photographer and ask their permission - once you receive it in a written form, go ahead and draw all you want (credit too, please). Stock and resource photography is usually free to use, as long as you follow the stocker's rules.

Important link > References by SylwiaTelari

DA Copyright Policy


butterfly animation 5 



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Traditional art techniques

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 7:54 AM


Traditional art techniques I


Traditional Art Week continues! This article will give you a brief overview of most commonly used physical media techniques and their characteristics, featuring beautiful examples found all over DeviantArt and tutorials. I sincerely hope this will get you inspired to try something new and experiment, why not pick a tutorial and see what you learn! Don't forget, whilst techniques has their own regulations and principles, they still can be combined, you have to be no wizard (just a little creative) to find a new way to express yourself through them. Let's take a look  Singing 




1. Drawing media


Drawing is one of the major forms of expression within the visual arts, and is generally concerned with the marking of lines and areas of tone onto paper. Traditional drawings were monochrome, or at least had little color,  while modern colored-pencil drawings may approach or cross a boundary between drawing and painting. Drawing is often exploratory, with considerable emphasis on observation, problem-solving and composition. It is also regularly used in preparation for painting. A quick, unrefined drawing may be called a sketch. In fields outside art, technical drawings or plans of buildings, machinery, circuitry and other things are often called "drawings" even when they have been transferred to another medium by printing. (Wiki)


▲ Pencil, Graphite, Charcoal

We discussed these materials very closely in an Artist's Toolbox article "Pencil, Graphite, Charcoal". It seems these techniques are too simple, but pencil in hands of a dedicated artist turns into a magic wand. Tutorials to see > Basic pencil tutorial by leinef, Charcoal tutorial by variations, Basic pencil shading by Snigom

I don't have a title for this one yet by tdylan Fullsleeve Commission by Asfahani


▲ Colored & watercolor pencils

Unlike graphite and charcoal pencils, colored pencils' cores are wax-based and contain varying proportions of pigments , additives and binding agents. They can be used in combination with several other drawing mediums. When used by themselves, there are two main rendering techniques colored pencil artists use - layering or burnishing. Learn more about colored pencils from our Artist's Toolbox article written by Astralseed. Tutorials to see > Color pencil tutorial by Verlisaerys, Colored pencil tutorial by emperpep, Watercolor pencils tutorials by martinacecilia

Empath by JenniferHealy Hidden Smile by XRlS


▲ Dry / Oil pastel

Pastel is an art medium in the form of a stick, consisting of pure powdered pigment and a binder. The pigments used in pastels are the same as those used to produce all colored art media, including oil paints; the binder is of a neutral hue and low saturation. Pastel techniques can be challenging since the medium is mixed and blended directly on the working surface, and unlike paint, colors cannot be tested on a palette before applying to the surface. Pastel errors cannot be covered the way a paint error can be painted out. Experimentation with the pastel medium on a small scale in order to learn various techniques gives the user a better command over a larger composition. We will talk more about pastels in future Artist's Toolbox articles. Tutorials to see > Pastel tutorial by Sarahharas07, Oil pastel tutorial 1 layering by TArthurSmith, Soft pastel dust tutorial by TeaKitsune

An Irish lady by portvoller WHITE BLOSSOMS by Badusev


▲ Ink

Ink is a liquid or paste that contains pigments or dyes and is used to color a surface to produce an image, text or design. The reason I'm listing ink as a drawing medium is that it's most commonly used for drawing or writing, even though it's liquid form makes him suitable for painting as well. Ink can be a complex medium, composed of solvents, pigments, dyes and other materials - the components of inks serve many purposes; the ink’s carrier, colorants, and other additives affect the flow and thickness of the ink and its appearance when dry. For further reading > 9 Reasons to love your ink. Tutorials to see > Traditional Ink tutorial by kitton, Scribbly and Ink tutorial by ursulav, Coloring tutorial - ink - wash basic by judittondora

Ink faces studies by AuroraWienhold Miss Doubtful by PabloJuradoRuiz




1. Painting media

Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a surface. The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and airbrushes can be used. Painting is a mode of creative expression, and the forms are numerous. Drawing, composition or abstraction and other aesthetics may serve to manifest the expressive and conceptual intention of the practitioner. Different types of paint are usually identified by the medium that the pigment is suspended or embedded in, which determines the general working characteristics of the paint, such as viscosity, miscibility, solubility, drying time, etc. (Wiki)


▲ Oil painting

is the process of painting with pigments  that are bound with a medium of drying oil. Commonly used drying oils include linseed oil, poppyseed oil, walnut oil and safflower oil. Different oils confer various properties to the oil paint, such as less yellowing or different drying times. Certain differences are also visible in the sheen of the paints depending on the oil. An artist might use several different oils in the same painting depending on specific pigments and effects desired. The paints themselves also develop a particular consistency depending on the medium. For further reading > 9 Reasons to adore oil paints. Tutorials to see > Tools and tips for oil painting by Moliugele, Oil painting tutorial by Misted-Dream, How to oil paint - layering by PhilipBohlmann


Street by StudioUndertheMoon Tai Yang by SRaffa


▲ Acrylic painting

Acrylic paint is fast drying paint containing pigment suspension in acrylic polymer emulsion. Acrylic paints can be diluted with water, but become water-resistant when dry. Depending on how much the paint is diluted (with water) or modified with acrylic gels, media, or pastes, the finished acrylic painting can resemble a watercolor or an oil painting, or have its own unique characteristics not attainable with other media. The main practical difference between most acrylics and oil paints is the inherent drying time. Oils allow for more time to blend colors and apply even glazes over under-paintings. This slow drying aspect of oil can be seen as an advantage for certain techniques, but in other regards it impedes the artist trying to work quickly. For further reading > 9 Reasons to appreciate acrylics. Tutorials to see > Acrylics material Introduction by trenchmaker, Acrylic Demo - A middle ground by the-artists-cubby, Acrylic painting tutorial by miimork

Kuba + Kasia by yelou Hunting with Dad by tjatkings

▲ Watercolor painting

Watercolor is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water soluble vehicle. The traditional and most common support for watercolor paintings is paper. Watercolors are usually transparent, and appear luminous because the pigments are laid down in a relatively pure form with few fillers obscuring the pigment colors, but can also be made opaque by adding Chinese white. Watercolor painting has the reputation of being quite demanding. Unlike oil or acrylic painting, where the paints essentially stay where they are put and dry more or less in the form they are applied, water is an active and complex partner in the watercolor painting process, changing both the absorbency and shape of the paper when it is wet and the outlines and appearance of the paint as it dries. The difficulty in watercolor painting is almost entirely in learning how to anticipate and leverage the behavior of water, rather than attempting to control or dominate it. We discussed watercolor equipment in quite a detail in our Artist's Toolbox series > Watercolor Equipment I and II, Additional Tools. For further reading > 9 Reasons to paint with watercolor. Tutorials to see > Tutorial - watercolor + Gel pen by Losenko, Walkthrough - Ozelot in watercolor by LittleMissRaven, Watercolor tutorial by cherriuki

Painted songs by AuroraWienhold urban forest by koyamori



▲ Gouache painting


Gouache is a water based paint consisting of pigment and other materials designed to be used in an opaque painting method. Gouache differs from watercolor in that the particles are larger, the ratio of pigment to water is much higher, and an additional, inert, white pigment such as chalk is also present. This makes gouache heavier and more opaque, with greater reflective qualities. Like all watermedia, it is diluted with water.
Tutorials to see > Gouache tutorial by bratkitty

Venus Incarnate by SillyJellie in gouache by derekjones





What is your favorite technique? Do you like to mix different media?


Your thoughts and comments are welcome!


:frail:


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If you like it, Feature it

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 6:29 AM


If you like it, Feature it


Why should we bother writing journals and articles featuring art? It takes time and effort but is it really worth it? Do people read and look through our features?

I'll try to explore some of these questions in my today's article and I'd like you to write your experience and opinions as well!


:frail:


Reasons to feature


"Why bother" is a question that a proud community member never asks himself. First of all, DeviantArt is a place of inspiration filled with pictures, rarely a person gets by without browsing art and eventually "faving" them. Some people focus entirely on collecting artworks into their Favorites folders - this action and displaying artworks in your journal or a poll brings me to the first reason, supporting the artist. Further than that, it starts a dialogue between you and the featured artist (either via Mentions or by letting them know about the feature yourself). Many artists on the site react positively to being featured, they are willing to thank you and often view the journal and your profile - you're supporting your own exposure as well! Interaction is what makes the community alive and by extension makes us happy for being part of it. My third reason is simple - it's fun!




Making it look nice


Have I sold you on the reasons? (assuming the answer is yes) Good, let's talk about how to do it without losing the crowd. There are always few things to avoid when featuring artworks, to make sure they are accessible and a positive experience to every viewer. I'll try to list a few of the "bad habits" here:



way too many thumbnails > causes that the feature loads very slowly on many computers, therefore a considerable amount of your viewers won't even take a look at it as they're resurrecting their browser

no system whatsoever > your pictures are scattered around the journal as if they're trying to escape far away from you

blinking or otherwise aggressive journal skin > it's hard on your eyes and takes all attention away from the thumbs, rather use something simple, clean and nice

length > nothing is worst than having to scroll through your feature for ages, chances are your viewers just won't bother

mismatched size in thumbs/images > use sta.sh writer to re-size thumbnails easily and quickly




:thumbsdown: Example no.1 - NO


Idril Light by Venlian        Apples by andr3d  Perfume by Raipun     dark waves by TanyaShatseva

Dreamland by AuroraWienhold     Summer Breeze by KatrinaWinter       water show by agnes-cecile




:thumbsup: Example no.2 - YES


Summer Breeze by KatrinaWinter dark waves by TanyaShatseva Idril Light by Venlian
Apples by andr3d Dreamland by AuroraWienhold
Perfume by Raipun  water show by agnes-cecile

Back to Top




Happy featuring! :frail:


Also, join our Traditional artwork FEATURE CONTEST (9th - 15th December)!

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Traditional artwork FEATURE CONTEST

Mon Dec 9, 2013, 12:05 PM



Traditional Artwork FEATURE CONTEST



We are starting our Traditional Art Week with a CONTEST for you! No extreme efforts needed, all you'll be required to do in order to qualify for entering is to FEATURE 10 of your favorite traditional artworks - we want to see what you like and enjoy! Contest starts now (when this blog entry is published) and ends on Sunday, 15th of December (afternoon, PST). 3 Winners will be announced in a Traditional Art Week Summary blog and also in this journal (updated) and awarded a 3 months premium membership each!

:eager:





✿✿✿     UPDATE - WINNER ANNOUNCEMENT     ✿✿✿


We picked 3 winners (features awarded by the highest amount of points from all 3 judges), who will receive a 3-month premium membership!

Raven Feature by WintersRead
Traditional Feature by TinyWild
Marvelous Sketches Feature by zidaria


CONGRATULATIONS!



We'd like to thank everyone who participated in this contest and mainly for featuring art all around the site. Please, make this a good habit :heart:




❢ Quest Objectives 



✒ Find 10 traditional artworks of your choice & taste

✒ publish a journal, in which you feature these artworks
in the most appealing way (using sta.sh is highly recommended)

✒ do so by Sunday, December 15th (afternoon, PST)

✒ comment on this journal, adding link to your feature
(you can only enter with 1 journal feature)




✰ Judging your features



✒ Your entries will be judged by Astralseed, ArtByCher and me, jane-beata

✒ Our decision will be based on factors such as overall appeal of the feature,
popularity of the artworks displayed (featuring unseen artists will get you further with us),
theme of your feature (you can get creative and pick a specific topic for your feature)

✒ Tips on how to feature artworks properly can be found HERE

:frail:


Let's get featuring!


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Traditional Art Week INTRODUCTION

Mon Dec 9, 2013, 6:03 AM


Hello everyone Hi!

Welcome to a Traditional Art Week (9th - 15th December)!


After a long while we are back with the entire week dedicated to Traditional art! Our small team has put their heads together to bring you a handful of articles that we believe you will find useful and interesting, along with a fantastic interview and a contest. Don't forget to join our chat event on Sunday (15th of December) that will take place over at #CommunityRelations, noon PST (12.00 pm) - we'll see you there!

If you wish to contribute a traditional art-related article during our next Traditional Art Week (March 2014), please send me a note! :heart:


Monday December 9th

Traditional Art Week Introduction blog by jane-beata
Traditional art FEATURE CONTEST by jane-beata


Tuesday December 10th

If you like it, Feature it by jane-beata
Bump up your color by Xadrea

Wednesday December 11th

Traditional art techniques by jane-beata
How to photograph paintings by ArtByCher


Thursday December 12th

What to keep in mind when submitting traditional artworks by jane-beata
References by SylwiaTelari


Friday December 13th

Interviewing AuroraWienhold by jane-beata
Silk screen basics by Astralseed


Saturday December 14th

How to sell your artwork by ArtByCher
5 Reasons to try it the traditional way by jane-beata

Sunday December 15th

Chat event by Astralseed
Traditional Art Week Summary blog by jane-beata


We hope you all enjoy, keep in touch! :la:

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