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PE: Presentation matters

Wed Aug 7, 2013, 11:23 AM



It's not just the artwork that tells you something about it's creator - on the internet, the way you present it is at least equally as important. Your painting can be a masterpiece, hanged in a local gallery, but as long as you post a blurry, badly cropped picture named "1564873" along with "..." in an artist's description, nobody will ever bother visiting your gallery. Creating a nice, representative profile page and setting a certain visual quality standard takes extra time and effort, but if you really care for your work (even if it's just a hobby), you should treat it with some respect.

I've already written a related article called The power of context that tried to explain how to place your work in a context in order to better connect with your audience, this one is focused on the visual aspect of your presentation (particularly on DeviantArt) and brings a few tips regarding Your Deviation, ✿ Your Gallery, ✿ Your Profile Page and finally bringing to your attention a few Other Websites you should consider using.



Presentation by LokiMuje




✿    1. Your Deviation



✿ always publish the best quality photographs/scans of your work possible, properly cropped and executed. While it's understandable that not everyone owns a proper equipment or knowledge of how to do this the right way, in most cases solution can be found if it's searched for - try asking a friend or a colleague for help with pictures or see if they would borrow you a camera, search advices of how to photograph artworks online or within DA experienced photographers. Here is two helpful tutorials you can check out: Art Tutorial: How to photograph artwork by Xadrea, How to Photograph Art by Jon-Snow. Those of you that don't have a scanner but have a smartphone, there's usually a good app that will turn your snapshot into a proper scan, for example Genius Scan.

✿ your logo or signature shouldn't be missing on any of your published artworks. It should be recognizable, comprehensible, visually attractive and at appropriate size. Regarding watermarking, it's certainly a solution to potential art theft, but you should carefully consider how you use them, watermarks often obstruct the image inadequately, it can discourage groups from accepting the artwork or viewers from faving it. Instead of DA watermarks, try creating your own, tasteful yet useful. Related tutorials > Protection from Art Theft by Xadrea

✿ give your deviation a fitting and appropriate name. After all, it's a piece of your work and it deserves it.

✿ even if it's not a prerequisite to proceed with the submission process, add keywords to optimize your deviation, this will help people to find it in a search. Type accurate and your deviation-related keywords into the "keywords" tab. Keywords Tutorial by UnicornReality, How to get the most out of your keywords by Thunderstatement

Keywords Stamp by LumiResources

✿ use the artist's description window - besides describing your work process or thoughts regarding the subject, don't forget to list techniques (many groups will accept your submission faster if you list your techniques in a comprehensive way) and references / credits. Less text is better than 10 paragraphs but no text whatsoever is very discouraging. How about motivating viewers to go see the rest of your gallery? Simply add thumbnails of your other works into this window (up to 6 thumbnails allowed).






✿   2.Your Gallery


stamp - i :heart: my gallery by Daeg-Niht


Featured folder in your gallery is probably the most important of all - it's the first one anyone would see when clicking on your "Gallery" icon and the first impression will most likely to decide whether the viewer goes further to explore the rest of your folders / pages of your gallery, adds you to their watch or leaves. Every once in a while, make sure to check the look of your Featured folder, always display your best works in there and overall, try to make it as much representative as you can.

Gallery folders also hold an important role, some use them to split their work into categories (which I personally see as a good idea), some keep all of their deviation in the Featured. If you decide to create gallery folders, establish a comprehensive order amongst them and it's better not to create too many.

Customizing the look of your entire gallery - you can change the gallery background as well as set your custom icons to each gallery folder. Tutorials that might come in handy > Custom Gallery Folder Icon Tutorial by Gasara, Custom Box Tutorial by TaNa-Jo (Premium Membership required to install custom boxes). Keep in mind that a loud, visually severe and/or blinking background is probably going to scare visitors off or freeze their browser than work in your favor. Related Tutorials > How to pimp your gallery by Salix-Sericea, A Guide to Gallery CSS by SimplySilent


Vivacious Gallery CSS by SimplySilent







✿   3. Your User Profile



✿ Choice of your deviant ID should be representative as well - many visitors will be curious about your ID and it's connection to the type or artwork you do. Your avatar is probably even more important, visual memory often works better than remembering your username - try not to change it too often.

Customizing your user profile - premium members have access to much better customization and widgets than non-premium members, but that doesn't mean you cannot have an orderly and nice profile page. As with everything, less is often more and crowded page rather confuses than helps. There is no need to expose your entire gallery there, offer one or two representative works and let viewers come for the rest. Need more tips on how to handle this? Check out CustomizeYourProfile group!

:iconcustomizeyourprofile:

✿ Don't forget about your journal - premium members can install many wonderful journal skins or create their own (Tutorial: Making Journal Skins from scratch by X-P-T-Z, Do-It-Yourself Journal Skin by miontre).

✿ Related Tutorials > Decorating Your Profile by SimplySilent, Pretty Up Your Profile and Pretty Up Your Profile 2.0 (Beginner) by Gasara





✿   4. Other websites



✿ If you're a Facebook user, you might want to create a page to share your artworks. It is a good way to connect your real life friends and family with your hobby/work but also reach different people. Sharing snapshots and WIP's on FB is faster and more casual than on DA and if you have an online store (ETSY, Bigcartel, etc.), you will be able to install an app straight to your page that will allow visiting FB users to enter your shop straight from the page.



 
Society6 is a platform that sells prints of your artworks. You provide a digital file, they ship products to customers - very similar to DA prints. Creating a profile & taking care of it (updating new artworks & products) takes very little of your time.

Free shipping on society6! by TheQueenSerena


Twitter also takes little of your time and is perfect for sharing short & quick messages or snapshots from your studio or anything you wish to share. I love twitter widget that premium members can install to their user profile to have their tweets visible and easily accessible to their DA visitors.

Twitter by Light-Schizophrenia

✿ Could I forget to mention Instagram, that is rather a phone app but also an excellent way to instantly share your artwork and visual news.

Instagram by xloveneverfails






Do you pay attention to the way you present yourself on the internet? How much time on average does it take you to submit a deviation?

Do you read artist's description when looking at a deviation that interests you?


Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below :heart:


:frail:

Credits > Thanks to im-not-sana for the article edit and great suggestions :heart:






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Article about visual presentation of your artworks on DeviantArt written for Community Week of #projecteducate :dalove:
Add a Comment:
 
:iconceares:
Ceares Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
really interesting piece. I actually use DA as a sort of digital storage for my work, add in 70 hr work weeks and some dry spells and there are a so a lot of the features I haven't investigated. This has inspired me to try and figure out how to dress up my gallery a little though, to make it a more pleasant viewing experience for any visitors.
Reply
:iconsandrahultsved:
SandraHultsved Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
I would like to add to #2 Gallery folders, a big nono is to not have ANY artworks in the featured folder at all...I've seen many do that and I can not understand why? Cause I'm not going to choose a specific folder to view your work:P

Great tips anyway!
Reply
:iconimdsound:
IMDSound Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Great read! Definitely getting on this!
Reply
:iconfmr0:
fmr0 Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2014
Thanks for making this article :D
Reply
:iconlady-compassion:
Lady-Compassion Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Awesome advice!  But I must confess that I have a horrendous habit of using the mighty...ellipse. 

I believe their may be hope for me yet....:sun:
Reply
:iconhosagu:
hosagu Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Excellent and very helpful! :)
Reply
:iconi2amartist:
I2AMARTIST Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Awesome thing, it's really helpful and simple. Perfect for the beginners like me! ^ ^
Reply
:iconthequeenserena:
TheQueenSerena Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
thanks for featuring me, this is a very interisting article :)
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
:clap: well said! (and thankies for linking some of my tutorials!)
Reply
:iconminakie:
Minakie Featured By Owner Edited Aug 6, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I think it's rather amusing that this was posted precisely when I was in the middle of reorganizing both my profile and my gallery =p
I had already come across some of the tutorials mentioned, but I'll make sure to revisit them all.
I feel like I'm still struggling to make my profile feel more like me and, without a PM, I'll probably always feel like that. It's as if no matter how many times I change it and improve it, there's always something missing.

Also, I noticed you could link to specific sections of the journal (like "Your Gallery" and "Your Profile Page"). Are we required to have a PM in order to use the journal code that will allow us to do that?
Reply
:icontouchofthesoul:
touchofthesoul Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
very informative article!
Reply
:iconrainbow-moose:
Rainbow-Moose Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Student General Artist
I've been wanting to create a facebook page to post art to for a long long time BUT I've been going back and forth on which type of page it should be. 

Entertainment? Local business? Brand/Product? 

This has puzzled me for quite a while. 

This probably is the wrong place to be asking such a thing, but what would you think it would fall under?

Anybody's opinions are welcome 
Reply
:iconkhyrkat:
khyrkat Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2014   General Artist
And I so miss the times when artists weren't forced to play with this mad social machine. I still believe art will defend itself. I don't do fb, twitter, I don't do self-promotion because it is not my nature. I don't think my art is so damn great that people will buy it even if I hang it in my garage and sit and wait until they come but I focus on art, not selling myself. We made it crazy - art, treated like something pure, something that could make our souls go higher - became a product soon to be sold on toilet paper. I am starving artist and of course I wish to sell my works but not for the price of my freedom. Not for the price of my own personality. Does that make me worthless artist? After seeing all this madness with artists whoring themselves - yes. But I prefer to stay away from the noise and be appreciated by few people who actually want to see my work than worshipped by those who only joined the bandwagon. I do have my works put in various online galleries for sale but I don't force people to look at them, don't scream "hey, look, this is my work, c'mon buy it!" I don't advertise my books - they are available in real bookstores so everyone able to read can find them. I don't put WIPs, don't do videos (used to but it was too exhausting mentally), I don't "share" - this sharing made us empty, gave us false feeling of being one big family while in fact we know nothing about the person sitting along us. Popularity based on social networking is overrated and leaves little place to think of what the artist wants to really do. It makes art shallow and art shouldn't be shallow. I understand the need to show paintings but there needs to be balance. That is why there are art magazines and if they request my work for show off I do accept it because it is extremely nice feeling. I prefer to create and be appreciated for creation, not for my social skills (which I do not have, as you can see).
Current trend of artists selling themselves everywhere made a niche for those who don't agree with this. I'm afraid this niche soon will be filled with artists tired of this noise and so it will not be as quiet as it used to be but that is an acceptable change in times, we have to survive this social madness to get back to our human roots.
Reply
:iconmaygusta:
MAYGUSTA Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
While I actually quite agree with you, personally - artists have always, as you put it, "whored" themselves out to earn a living. They've gone above and beyond the norm when trying to sell themselves because custom art isn't something that the average person will ever consider buying, and so to make them buy it, you have to really push yourself onto them.

Maybe they will feel that you're a horribly pushy person and will never buy from you again - it doesn't matter. They weren't that likely to buy from you the first time, and if you hadn't pushed them so hard, they probably wouldn't have. You have the money, now, and they have the art.

For all people in all careers - especially creative ones - you have to push, push, and push harder. If art is all you are interested in creating, the above advice in the article is probably not very relevant, but if you're trying to turn a hobby or a passion into a career or business, then "whoring" yourself out is a part of the process. It may be one that many people are reluctant to do, but as someone who's been around on this site for over eleven years now, trust me when I say the artists who make a living from exclusively online commissions (which is an unfortunate must in many cartoon or anime artists cases), are the ones who had to sell themselves first.
Reply
:iconkhyrkat:
khyrkat Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014   General Artist
I've been on this site for more than 7 years and always rejected typical whoring side of art. I still believe art should speak for itself, not because I'm lazy but because art was always something way different than other things you can buy. Too many times I've seen poor quality work promoted so hard it was finally sold, while valuable paintings were sitting in galleries for ages just because the artist is not willing to literally sell them on toilet paper. It's a rat race that art will not benefit from.
I'm not a novice, as you may probably suspect. I write and illustrate children books, I have a publisher, a real one not some ebook stuff. I've been doing commissions for years, published in magazines, illustrated books and book covers for major publishers, have done all sorts of promotions. It just doesn't fit my philosophy. Sure, I had money but most of all I felt like a whore and this is what I meant. Yes, commission work didn't come on its own, I had to show myself to many people but it was years ago and it looked different. Internet was not everything, it was minor medium to show off, now it's main and it can pretend to be anything. I'm not a 20 or something who starts off and creates account on every dev clone found in the internet just to "mark their name". Art should mark their name. Maybe it's old fashioned but I myself am more willing to support someone who has good art and doesn't have to convince the world about this fact than someone who shouts from every internet site "meeee! buy meeeeeeee! I am gooooooooood!"
There is not much to say about this subject other than it has been talked over and over for years and the more fancy tools are available in digital world, the more random people grab Wacoms and state they do commissions of Toothless etc. is this the quality of art we are striving for?
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
It's great you have those accomplishments under your belt but you would not even being working with a publishing company if you had not advertised your skills in one way or another to your clients or employers. That is precisely what artists are doing now with the use of social media. 

Your disdain for social media is somewhat confusing to me as well. It's worked exceedingly well for me as I begin my career as a freelance artist to be able to connect with companies, other artists, and designers quickly and effectively. Your "art should speak for itself" diatribe is very dry. If a tree falls in the woods and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? The answer is obviously yes, but if there was no one there to hear it does it even matter a sound was made in the first place

I very much don't appreciate your attitude toward digital art. I'm a traditional artist, I was formally trained as one, and water based media is my main tool. I own and use a Wacom Bamboo, I have the Adobe Suite and other digital programs. What you, and others who indict this medium, seem to think is that it's "easy" or lowbrow. A tablet cannot magically give you the tools to effectively tackle two-point perspective any more than a program can instantly cure your troubles with color temperature. 

If you feel the need to throw fellow artists under the bus to make yourself feel good you need to check yourself. This elitist nostalgia you've got going on is highly unbecoming. That was then, this is now. You don't have to embrace the way things are evolving, but keeping your snooty attitude to yourself would be a great step in the right direction.
Reply
:iconmaygusta:
MAYGUSTA Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Okay firstly you're being incredibly rude insulting groups of artists based on how they got started, their ages, and their interests. If I was a 20-something, who wanted to draw commissions of Toothless with a Wacom I picked up only yesterday, I would be well within my right as an ARTIST. If you don't want to partake in "whoring" yourself out: don't. Still, I notice you're a member of twenty groups. So, you're still happy to share your art with others, but on your terms. That's reasonable. What's also reasonable, is other artists wishing to share their art with others on their terms, which may or may not be a mass-social-media-art-dump in your eyes. It's irrelevant what you think, because your way is not correct. You don't hold the authority on what counts as sharing, and where it crosses the line into "whoring".

Secondly, I don't assume ANYTHING about you. I don't know you. I don't make wild judgements about people I've never met. Having read your response, I do feel that you are quite elitist though - and that's something that transcends age, because it comes across as something rather juvenile. I don't know where you've been published, and I don't care, because that's also irrelevant. If you're happy with the way your art is being received, then that's brilliant! That's what so many artists strive to achieve, and sadly many never achieve. I believe it is irrelevant how we get there, so long as we don't do anything that we'll regret too much.

I think you're a little misguided on how art sells online. I can't speak for everyone, but the other day, I decided I wanted some pictures drawn of two of my characters, so I took to the forums. I didn't have to go searching in every crack and crevice for artists, I decided I'd let them come to me. That would have been much harder without social media sites such as deviantART. Anyway, I asked people to leave samples and prices, and I looked through a LOT of potential artists. Some, I thought were horribly overpriced, and some I thought were a bargain. And actually, they were mostly of a similar level, and of a similar price range. The art I thought was worth something, I was happy to spend the money on - and the art I didn't want, I wouldn't have been happy to spend ANY money on. Price and worth are different things, and it wasn't the person that sold the art to me, it was definitely the art speaking.

No matter what job you get, you will be required to sell yourself. As an artist, you have to work doubly as hard, because the average person doesn't respect or understand art the same way a fellow artist will, and the fellow artist generally won't pay as much as the average Joe will. This is amplified online. Yeah, it might be a shame. Yes, it may be attacking the integrity of art in the eyes of many people. But it is what it is. Some people don't feel that the change is bad. That doesn't make them right, and it doesn't make you right.

It was never 'better' back then, and it isn't 'better' now. It's just different. What makes you feel like a whore, may not make other people feel like a whore. I personally wouldn't want my artwork on toilet paper, but to someone else, that might be perfectly reasonable. Most importantly, it's not our place to judge that person as whether or not they are worthy to be an artist. They have created, therefore they are an artist and that isn't disputable.

Art you deem of a poor quality is just art you don't like. It's no better or worse than your art, it's just art and you don't like that particular style, piece, or artist. Or perhaps you don't like that it generated more revenue than one of your own pieces or something. I find it absurd that someone so focused and so passionate about art can even talk about 'good' and 'bad' art, or one form being more worthy than another. It's ludicrous. Sure, not everybody's master and control of technique and theory is on par with one another, but you can't judge someone's meaning behind their piece - and you can't judge the resonance it has with someone who wants to buy it.

While it's honestly a shame that some artworks gather dust in galleries while other artworks are printed onto everything tangible in existence, it boils down to one thing. At the end of the day you have to weigh up what's more important: painting and painting alone, or painting, talking and selling. If these gallery artists want to sell on a mass scale, they need to evolve with the market, and if they don't, I see no issue with their artworks hanging in the galleries they chose to hang them in. Should they have to "whore" themselves out just to earn a dollar? Actually, yes. They should. The moment you start painting for other people, is the moment you start painting on someone else's terms, and the terms of the majority are in social media right now. Artists are well within their right to not do that, but then they can't expect to generate the same revenue as those who go above and beyond with self-advertisement.

I appreciate that it doesn't fit your philosophy. I personally don't like the way social media has taken over, either, but I have two choices - I can embrace it, and join in and earn, or I can struggle and strive, and search for work with needless difficulty. However, in my response I did say, if you want to sell almost exclusively online to earn a LIVING, then you're going to have to "whore" - if you don't (which I assume is you, as you're happy selling to tangible mediums), then you really don't need to.

Either way, people are never going to buy art they genuinely don't like - no matter how hard you push them (unless you outright lie to them about its value, which isn't an online-only thing, and has been happening for centuries in the tangible world) - so it isn't exclusively a person that sells the art, the art always has to sell itself... the person just directs the traffic towards their art - they can dominate the pool of customers, but the art still has to talk.
Reply
:iconmyllady:
Myllady Featured By Owner May 27, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hi !!!

  Thanks a lot for this article ! I'm new as a 'sharer' on DA and i'm still trying to enthurstand everything. This article is REALLY helpful to me, as are the links you gave. I really appreciate you taking the time to write it :)

Have a wonderful day !!!!
Reply
:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner May 27, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
And you too - thanks for stopping by :)
Reply
:icongoodnight-melbourne:
Goodnight-Melbourne Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2014   Traditional Artist
Hello,
This is a pretty helpful article. But at just one point I'm doubting, you can say confused.
You talked about keywords or tags (but missed the point which I'm going to talk about) and listed How to get the most out of your keywords by Thunderstatement where it says to add as many keywords as possible.
Earlier I have read many articles that say entering more than 10 tags can make the search engines bots take the post as spam. They take the excess tags as spam index, and they mostly use the words as keywords that are used in the actual post in written form, i.e. Description.
As a similar effect, if one posts a blog or anything with too many tags, this is most possible that it will get less viewers. This is the thumbrule of blogging.
These two things make me confused.
Now if deviantart's search engine is any different than this or if keywords and tags are not same, then my point is invalid. 

Thank you.


Reply
:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Your concern is reasonable, but it should be posted at the article about keywords instead of this one - my article about presentation touches this subject only briefly, it's why I linked resources for further reading. Perhaps your question could be answered there :)
Reply
:icongoodnight-melbourne:
Goodnight-Melbourne Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2014   Traditional Artist
Hello,
I understand.  I will ask  Thunderstatement too. Just wrote here because you should know as you are referring to that article. Also I think  Thunderstatement already got a notification that I mentioned.

Thank you for replying !
Reply
:iconlintu47:
lintu47 Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
    You make some great points in there :nod:
Reply
:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for reading, dear :)
Reply
:iconlintu47:
lintu47 Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
    I always do, but lately i'm so slow and behind with reading the journals that it takes me up to 4 hours to get rid of the stack. So sorry for being a little late. By the way, that tick is really looking nice to your username, it feels like it's been there for a long time already :heart:
Reply
:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I'm late with replying as well :( Thank you, I like the tick very much  but it will take at least one more week to get used to it :giggle:
Reply
:iconlintu47:
lintu47 Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
    Seems about right, i needed time to get used to it too. I think i should name it : )
Reply
:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
I call my tick "Orlando" :D
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:iconlintu47:
lintu47 Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
    Oh that's a handsome name :love:
Reply
:iconiamanelebiscarra:
iAmAneleBiscarra Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
so helpful! with a lot of useful links as well! :squee:
Reply
:iconunicornreality:
UnicornReality Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Awesome article!
Reply
:iconsun-lily:
sun-lily Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2013  Hobbyist
Clap Though some of this I knew, I learned a thing or two. 
Reply
:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
THIS. ALL OF THIS. I've seen so many people get stuck in a rut because their presentation was less than optimal. And although I don't typically direct clients to my dA page to view my work online, it is listed as a link on my resume so I try to keep it looking spiffy :D
Reply
:iconim-not-sana:
im-not-sana Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Wonderful and useful article! :thumbsup:
Reply
:iconmissdudette:
MissDudette Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013
:clap:
Reply
:iconcyphervisor:
CypherVisor Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013
Thanks for featuring our wonderful group! :hug:
Reply
:icondeshrubber:
deshrubber Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Great article! While a blank artist comment won't stop me from featuring artwork, a badly cropped or just plan bad photo will. I, and most people, want to see the work. Seeing a messy desk, concrete, or trees around the edges detracts from the work and pulls the eye away from it. Also, just a helpful tip, if you're going to use a gloss varnish, take the photographs of your work first and you'll have less chance glaring and hotspots in the photo. :salute:
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:iconmladavid:
Mladavid Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
<font><font>Thank you for the useful information!</font></font>Nod 
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:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for reading Yey
Reply
:iconh-a-cooke:
H-A-Cooke Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Do you pay attention to the way you present yourself on the internet? 

I have been on the internet since 6th grade, deviant art for 11 of the 13 years it's been a site. I take care in the presentation of myself, not just for safety reasons, but as a serious writer and artist. I think it's important to present as honest a version of myself as I can. I see no point in lying or otherwise altering my persona. 


 How much time on average does it take you to submit a deviation?

Anywhere from five to ten minutes. I attempt to include all the necessary information: Credits and copywrites, explanations of the art,  honorable mentions of watchers and contributors (those who draw cover art for me or edit my work) and add feedback questions to see if my writing serves its intended purpose. 

I think it's important to give information about a deviation, and to present enough ideas about the concept to get people thinking but leave room for interpretation. 

Do you read artist's description when looking at a deviation that interests you?

I do. I think in order to give proper feedback one must view an art or writing piece first and then read the author's comments. That way you can write an honest review of your reaction but also receive the back story. I think it creates untrue reviews to read the back story before the writing, especially for  poetry. 
Reply
:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for your comment, it's good to see how others perceive this topic :)
Reply
:iconh-a-cooke:
H-A-Cooke Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
You're welcome! All you say is true about presentation and not cluttering the Profile. I wish I new how to do CSS
Reply
:iconladybrookecelebwen:
LadyBrookeCelebwen Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Gallery folders are a really good thing for those of us that do a lot of different types of art! :D

Very nice article!
Reply
:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for reading :wave:
Reply
:iconladybrookecelebwen:
LadyBrookeCelebwen Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
You're welcome! :D
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:iconthequeenserena:
TheQueenSerena Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
thank you so much for featuring my work here! :hug:
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:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Pleasure :heart:
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:icontana-jo:
TaNa-Jo Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Omg thank you sooo much for sharing :3
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:iconjane-beata:
jane-beata Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for reading :heart:
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:icontana-jo:
TaNa-Jo Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
np^^
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